I hear the best stories

I just met two college students on a mission to get nurseries and big-box retailers to stop selling invasive, non-native plants in Texas. And they’ll do it, too.

They started their nonprofit, Eco Texas,  when they were sophomores at LBJ High School and run it now from Harvard and Cornell. So far, they’ve enlisted hundreds of teenage volunteers from all over Austin to cut down and remove invasive plants in several Austin preserves and parks.

Picture it: Teenagers, boys and girls, in the hot Texas sun, using hack saws and axes to save a park. Can’t picture it? See the photos here.

The energy, the creativity, the will to change Austin for the better is out there.

I’m lucky that I get to hear these kinds of stories every day. I just try to share the best ones with you.

Please keep an eye out for our next issue, which goes live on Tuesday. Share it with your friends. Thanks!

 

 

 

January 11: Next issue, next Givers Ball

Jan 11 Givers BallThe more I talk to people about Texas’ looming budget shortfall (projected to be between $14 and $24 billion) and its inevitable crushing of Austin – not just of local nonprofits because of the surge in demand and drop in support, but also of the local economy as state employees start to lose their jobs – the more I learn about it, the angrier I get.

But anger, fear and the related emotions are not productive reactions to the mess we’re in. So in that regard, the next issue of GivingCity Austin will offer productive, actionable things we can do to prepare and (maybe) avoid some of the devastation.

This issue is for Austinites who complain about the mess AND work to do something about it. So, you.

The launch of a new issue also gives us an opportunity to celebrate you, and specifically, the young and professional organizations that introduce philanthropy and civic engagement to hundreds of Austinites, usually over drinks and networking. Thank you.

Keep an eye out for the new issue announcement on January 11 (also first day of session), and join us that night for the Givers Ball. We’ve invited more than 30 YPOs, and we’re going to stir them up.

GivingCity Austin Givers Ball
January 11, 2011
6 – 8 pm
El Sol y La Luna
6th & Red River
Food, drinks and a special announcement
about our New Philanthropists issue

RSVP on Facebook

Not on Facebook? RSVP here.

Thanks to Austin Community Foundation

The fundraising event calendar for Austin

We’re happy to partner with Laura Villagran Johnson and Kevin Smothers of Austin Social Planner to create THE fundraising event calendar for Austin.

Actually, I’m not doing much. Laura and Kevin and team created this amazing platform with Austin Social Planner, and GivingCity Austin is just directing folks to use it. I get lots of “can you please list my event” requests, but without a calendar on which to list them, I couldn’t really fulfill that request. So here’s the answer.

Austin Social Planner is simple yet robust, fun yet thorough, and geared especially for those non-Chronicle type events that seem to fall off other calendars so often. Please check it out, and PLEASE list your fundraising event on this calendar.

Thanks! ALSO, please add our event to your calendar: The next GivingCity Givers Ball is 1/11/11 at El Sol y La Luna! I can’t wait to see you all again.

SAT DEC 11: Because toys make children happy, people

Look at these photos. Just look.

Did I tell you about the time I got the Barbie Dream House? It was amazing. I adore(d) Barbies, and getting that Dream House is one of my favorite memories — never mind that my grandmother actually pulled it out of a trash can to give to me.

I don’t mean to get sappy on you, because for me that’s still a happy memory. There’s no other way I would have ever had the Barbie Dream House; it just wasn’t in the budget for my family, you know? The point is, toys make a difference to kids. And YOU can help make that difference to kids this Saturday.

This Saturday is the 13th Annual River City Youth Foundation “Merry Memories” holiday event in Dove Springs, a community just southeast of Austin. More than 95% of the children living in Dove Springs receive federally subsidized lunch. (So in other words, ALL of them.) If they can’t afford lunch, what kind of Christmas do you think they’re going to have?

Here’s how you can help:

DONATE TOYS

VOLUNTEER TO SORT TOYS

Merry Memories

13th Annual Toy Give-Away

WHERE

Dove Springs Recreation Center
5801 Ainez Dr, Austin, TX 78744

WHEN

Sorting of toys starting at 9 a.m. Event runs from 12-3 PM

Individuals and groups welcome!

To donate or volunteer contact
Oné Musel-Gilley (pronounced onay)
(512) 576-0219
PR@rivercityyouth.org
or Mona Gonzalez at (512) 633-9708

Please tell us about yourself!

Miss Bean wants to know!

I feel like you know everything about me, probably more than you want to know. Now, please tell me a little about yourself.

We’ve created a 10-question reader survey to find out who you are and how you interact with Central Texas nonprofits. The more we know about you, the better GivingCity Austin can serve you.

Please click here to take the GivingCity Reader Survey. Thanks for your help and support!

Adopt a kid this holiday season, impact your own

One of my favorite parts of the holiday season as a child was always the Salvation Army’s Angel Tree. Every year, Mom would take me to go pick angels off the tree. We’d choose a boy near my age to adopt and I’d lead Mom through the clothing and toy departments, getting exactly what I thought that kid would want. Shopping for someone else my age was always a really exciting – and empowering – experience. I dreamt all year about that moment on Christmas morning when I opened my presents and was fortunate enough to always get exactly what I wanted. Being able to create for someone else the one thing I looked forward to all year made me feel like I could do anything.

It’s a testament to how impactful that experience was to me as a kid that I still remember it so vividly, three weeks away (!!!) from graduating from UT. If you’ve got children, you’d be hard-pressed to find a more meaningful way to spend the holidays with them. Of course, you don’t need to have your own kids to make someone else’s happy.

Luckily, there are plenty of opportunities to make someone’s holiday season. We’ve chronicled them in the latest GivingCity. If you’re short on cash, most of these events are looking for volunteers. If you’re short on time, most accept donations toward toy purchasing. No matter what you’ve got going on, you’ve got the opportunity to make the holidays happen for someone.

Will Austin lose a fantastic opportunity to help East Austin for a completely asinine reason?

Is it possible that after three years of immersing myself in the Central Texas nonprofit community – as part of our mission to bring more Central Texans into philanthropy – that  I am still completely clueless about how the system actually works. And I don’t mean I don’t understand a process, I mean I don’t understand how things work in the real world, which means that no matter how well meaning people are, they are still, in fact, people.

So please help me understand what’s going on in East Austin right now…..

1. Monica meets Southwest Key

The latest example of my naivete started with my visit to Southwest Key. You’ve heard of this place, right? You’ve seen them on the business journal’s list of the largest nonprofits in Central Texas (Southwest Key is number four). But what exactly do they do?

SWK started as a program to keep young people in San Antonio out of jail. Kids were being arrested and incarcerated for minor infractions when they really just needed some adult support in their lives. SWK founder, Juan Sanchez, swooped in to create programs that supported the kid and his whole family, really. Kids weren’t committing new crimes, not going back to jail, and the program was a success.

Soon, other cities started to ask him to set up programs for their communitiess, and Southwest Key was born. Today there are 55 programs with more than 1,000 employees in 7 states with an operating budget of $58 million from government grants, foundations, corporations and private donations. Sanchez is, by all accounts, on a mission and a positive force in the community.

2. Clearly, Southwest Key is committed to East Austin

In fact, he’s so committed to Hispanics and the economically disadvantages and, as he calls them, “kids,” that he moved his headquarters there. In 2007, Sanchez and his board completed construction of its national headqaurters, the East Austin Community Development Center, right across the street from the now-closed Johnston High School in the Govalle/Johnston Terrace neighborhood. The exact location was deliberate: This neighborhood needed an anchor, and Sanchez wanted to provide that.

At one point, people from Southwest Key went door-to-door asking residents what their neighborhood needs the most, what their children need the most. Not surprisingly, what they said was: a better education. (Obvious, right?)

3. Southwest Key’s promise to East Austin kids

This past school year, SWK opened the East Austin College Prep Academy. The open enrollment charter school will provide the first middle school class since Allen Junior High closed in the 1980s, a move that left the Govalle/Johnston Terrace neighborhood without a middle school.

The school  is small but really beautiful, with modern architecture and inspirational artwork, all in all a wonderful environment for that really awkward stage of adolescence. The “kids” are really proud of their school, and it shows. In fact, the whole headquarters is like an oasis to the blight around it.

(I keep putting “kids” in quotes because that’s how Sanchez talks about them. Not “at-risk youth” not “economically disadvantaged” not “impoverished.” In fact, he’s one of the rare nonprofit leaders I’ve met who doesn’t speak in “nonprofitese,” that politically correct, exacting language that may be polite but also keeps poor people at a safe distance.)

All this still makes sense to me, though it’s hard for me to get my head around all Southwest Key does – and why so few people realize the impact it’s having on one of the weakest links in the Austin school system. And Sanchez… why does he have such a low profile around Austin but a very high profile for his work everywhere else?

4. The Academy is modeled on a Harlem school

The middle school didn’t spring from the mind of Sanchez, who’s fiercely intelligent but also knows enough to take advantage of proven education models  to adapt to East Austin’s particular situation. In fact, the model the school’s based on is The Harlem Children’s Zone, a renowned program in New York City that operates an integrated system of education, social services and community-building programs to help children achieve their full potential. The whole system being build by Southwest Key is called the East Austin Children’s Promise.

Sanchez has been following the Harlem Children’s Zone model for years, and in fact, raised the money to build and launch the middle school East Austin so badly needs. Even more has been raised to add a high school, with plans for an elementary school, preschool and more programs that integrate community-building and education.

5. Obama’s plan to grow more Promise Neighborhoods

Southwest Key recognized a strong model in Harlem Children’s Zone – and so did the Obama administration. In fact, earlier this year, Obama signed a law to create funding for more HCZ or “Promise Neighborhoods.” The initial funds will allow for up to 20 planning grants of $500,000 each. Southwest Key is ready to apply for that funding to take its already established “Promise” neighborhood to the next level.

Great, right? I mean, Austin will have to compete with other cities like Chicago, Los Angeles, Detroit and just about every other city in the county, all of which have a much bigger reputation for bad neighborhoods. After all, Austin is known for being a great place to party and listen to music, not really for the work its doing to improve its schools.

But here’s what makes me realize how complicated our little city can be.

There are two communities from Austin applying for the Promise Neighborhood planning grant. One proposal will come from Southwest Key, the other will come from a group called the Austin Promise Neighborhoods Planning Team, which focuses on the north east Austin neighborhood near Reagan High School. Think both efforts will receive a planning grant? Most likely, only one will. So the two proposals – and really neighborhoods – will, in fact, compete with each other.

Sorry? Why are there two? Wouldn’t you think they’d combine efforts to make one strong proposal from East Austin? And wouldn’t you think they’d rally behind Southwest Key because they have, in fact, already created a Promise Neighborhood?

The organization that does win the $500,000 planning grant “would then receive multiyear financing from the U.S. Department of Education to take the program to scale – if they are able to raise matching funds from private or local government sources,” according to the Statesman. Whatever neighborhood wins, it will need to funnel all the money through a single organization to administer the grants.

6. East Austin vs. East Austin?

Now, Southwest Key already administers millions of dollars in government grants. It already has programs in place modeled on the Promise Neighborhoods pilot. And it has established its commitment to the Govalle/Johnston neighborhood by locating its headquarters there. So when the other organizations in Austin decided to go after this funding, why didn’t they get behind the Southwest Key effort?

The other effort is a big one. Almost everyone in Austin is behind the Austin Promise Neighborhoods Planning Team: City of Austin, Austin ISD, University of Texas, Seton Family of Hospitals, Austin/ Travis County Health and Human Services, LifeWorks, Foundation Communities, Communities in Schools, St. John Community School Alliance, E3 Alliance, United Way of the Capital Area, Sooch Foundation, Webber Family Foundation, Capital Area Council on Governments, East Side Social Action Coalition, and many elected officials, according to the Sooch Foundation. But they do not have the foothold that Southwest Key has.

So is this really Austin versus Southwest Key? Are we really pitting one East Austin neighborhood against another? And can somebody give me a really good reason why we have two teams?

I know there was an initial contact made to go to Washington D.C. as a team. I know at some point there was a decision to not work as a team. I know both neighborhoods really need a concerted, well financed effort to overcome the terrible conditions they’re in. But both teams can’t win. Where’s the collaboration, Austin?